Reading: Good For You, In Moderation

Okay, as I promised, I’d post on something I’m doing: catching up! Seriously, why do people keep writing kilo-worded articles? And all these must-read pieces… argh! Here’s what I haven’t gotten around to yet…

  1. The Weekend That Wall St. Died — The WSJ Journal piece that seems to be the answer to their three-part series on Bear Stearns.
  2. Fannie Mae’s Last Stand — Vanity Fair, in an effort to prove that they can write a lot of words about finance too, delivers 10,000 words on the G.S.E.’s end.
  3. Joe Nocera on VaR — Honestly, the fact that everyone read and commented on an article focused on VaR probably means I should get a less-nerdy blogroll. That being said, I can’t avoid the fact I’ll probably enjoy reading it.
  4. Two Part Op-ed from Einhorn and Michael Lewis — They should write a book. It can be called, “The New Profitable Thing: Fooling The Government All The Time”
  5. Judd Gregg’s Op-ed in the WSJ — Apparently, we (taxpayers) are making money hand over fist! Can I put more money with them?
  6. John Paulson’s Profile in Portfolio — The man put himself on the map and went from good, but not special, merger-arb to the king of the Fundhouse.
  7. The Reckoning — This series by the NYT goes int all sorts of topics. Really, though, NYT … China caused the crisis? Every article is lots of words.
  8. The End of Wall St. — Ugh. I know, should have read it by now. Sorry well-informed people.
  9. A Reasonable Query for AIG — Simply asks the question, “Where did the cash go?” I have no idea, I haven’t read it yet.
  10. AIG’s Bailout — A long article on it. That’s all I know.
  11. How India Avoided a Crisis — Joe Nocera talks about how India avoided … fine, you get it. Gotta be something worth knowing in here.
  12. How Spain Avoided a Crisis — It goes into some details about how they thought about the risks in the market and how they avoided the issues.
  13. Three Part Washington Post Series on AIG’s Collapse — By the end of this reading list I’m going to know every detail about the AIG bailout or the mainstream media should be vivisected.
  14. Anatomy of a Crisis — Profile of Bernanke and the crisis. It’s long and in the New Yorker, so it must be both worth reading and difficult to find the time and will to read.
  15. Euromoney Article on Lehman and Prime Brokerages — Once again, it’s long and it’s about a crisis. Must be worth reading.
  16. Banks vs. Consumers — In one corner you have lobbyists, PACs, and well-connected executives. In the other corner you have the people that actually elect the public officials who make that rules that will determine the outcome. Given that description, it has a surprise ending!
  17. NYT Advocates a Consumer Czar — This is just something I believe should be done. Hopefully they have facts I can arm myself with.
  18. Profile of Henry Blodget — This might actually remain on my list for a long time, since he never answers my emails. Although, Dan Frommer and I are Twitter pals, so maybe I’ll read it soon after all.
  19. Profile of Jimmy Cayne — I guess I’ll wait until I’m feeling down on myself…
  20. Inflation Swindles the Equity Investor — Not sure how this 1977 Warren Buffett article got on my list, but it hasn’t been on anywhere near as long as it’s been around.
  21. A Short Banking History of the U.S. — I have no idea how this got on there… NONE!
  22. A whole bunch of “Background of the Merger” sections from filings….

Argh. CliffsNotes… ?

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6 Comments on “Reading: Good For You, In Moderation”

  1. ECONinfo Says:

    […] Dear John Thain – interessanter Name für ein Blog – hat eine Liste mit gut 20 Artikeln zur Finanzkrise. 12. Januar 2009, 19:56 Uhr […]


  2. […] Reading: Good For You, In Moderation Okay, as I promised, I’d post on something I’m doing: catching up! Seriously, why do people keep writing […] […]


  3. […] Reading from Dear John Thain Here’s a quality list of articles on what has happened in the world of finance over the past year or so.  I can vouch […]


  4. […] Dear John Thain Once upon a time I wrote John Thain a letter. I never heard back. Maybe my thoughts need a broader audience. « Reading: Good For You, In Moderation […]

  5. Lance Says:

    The New Yorker piece on Bernanke is a waste of time.


  6. […] a year full of some truly remarkable financial writing (a sample), how many financial journalists were awarded Pulitzers? […]


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